Editorials

Joint initiative to train low-income women for eldercare sector

By ANNIKA MOCK

PUBLISHED APR 1, 2017, 5:00 AM SGT
Madam Wendy Teo Eng Yam, 42, felt 30 years older yesterday, thanks to an ageing simulation suit that restricts movement, vision and hearing to mimic the physical challenges faced by the elderly.

This was the highlight of a half-day workshop by social enterprise Etch Empathy at the HMI Institute of Health Sciences, with the aim of encouraging empathy for those in their silver years.

It was part of the Eldercare Program by voluntary welfare organisation Daughters of Tomorrow (DOT) and the Association of Women for Action and Research (Aware).

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Empathy for elderly can cut road fatalities

BY AARON YEOH

PUBLISHED: 4:00 AM, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

In May last year, an 83-year-old woman was killed when she was hit by a car while jaywalking. She was one of the growing number of elderly pedestrians killed in traffic accidents, which increased by 21.7 per cent last year.Although the number of road fatalities as a whole has gone down from 151 to 141 over the past year, more elderly pedestrians are getting injured or killed in traffic accidents, according to the latest statistics from the Traffic Police (TP).

In 2016, there was a 42.1 per cent increase from the previous year in the number of accidents involving elderly pedestrians who jaywalked.

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In their shoes: More Singaporeans turn to ‘poverty simulation’ exercises

BY 

POSTED 04 Feb 2016 21:53 & UPDATED 05 Feb 2016 10:28

SINGAPORE: More Singaporeans are signing up to understand first-hand the stress and constraints faced by the less fortunate.

Done through hands-on activities, demand for these poverty simulation exercises is also not just coming from the community sector – schools and corporate organisations have also been signing up.

ROLE-PLAYING

Most of the exercises involve some form of role-playing. Participants will take on the role of a person with specific constraints.

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Causes Week 2016: On a mission to bring empathy back into culture

BY NG HUIWEN

PUBLISHED DEC 11, 2016, 5:00 AM SGT
Etch Empathy organises Human Library event and exercises to experience real-life challenges
In our annual Causes Week, back for its fifth year, we spotlight individuals and groups that are making a difference in the community, and look at how others might pitch in too.

How do you develop empathy?

Local social enterprise, Etch Empathy, is teaching people to empathise through two innovative ways. One involves people acting as “books” in a Human Library, sharing their experiences with “readers”.

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Project Shine-a-Light

BY NATASHA LEE

PUBLISHED JUN 15, 2017, 5:00 AM

The third phase of Project Shine-A-Light was initiated this year in 2017 with a mentor from social enterprise Etch Empathy in order to address the problems faced by the visually impaired in the Home of Light school in Vientiane, Laos.

The Home of Light aims to provide a safe living environment and free education for around 50 children aged three to 18 who have eye conditions such as glaucoma and retinal detachment.

Etch Empathy, which was set up in 2013, was selected as a learning collaborator for the project as it has experience in designing programmes highlighting social challenges faced by communities such as the elderly, the visually impaired and the hearing-impaired.

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Channel Empathy Podcast

BY NATASHA LEE

PUBLISHED: 5:00 AM, JUN 15, 2017

A podcast launched recently aims to let more people know about the experiences of the marginalised, such as the physically impaired and people suffering from depression.

Called Channel Empathy, it is a collaboration between two non-profit organisations and three visually impaired individuals – Mr Joshua Tseng, Mr Muhammad Zahier Samad and Ms Erna, who goes by one name.

The two groups are Etch Empathy, which designs multi-sensory experiences to get more people to empathise with the vulnerable groups, and The Everyday People, a lifestyle portal which aims to connect with millennials in Singapore.

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